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Holiday Music to Cook By →

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Local chefs crank up these classics (and not-so-classics) for the holiday season
We asked local cooks, both home and professional, which holiday soundtracks are essential to their food prep this time of year. Here are a few of their classics to put into rotation, plus a few suggestions for new downloads. More

Farm Face - Rockdale Ranch →

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“I chose the Bison business because it is the best quality meat available.” —Charles Williamson
Charles Williamson has been in the bison business for 27 years, making him a specialty guru in Tennes- see. His favorite, the bison, tops the nutrient list and is lower in calories, cholesterol and fat, but higher in protein and minerals. More

The Readyville Mill →

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Back to the Grindstone with Local Food
iddle Tennesseans are blessed to have a plethora of restaurant choices when it comes to eating fresh and local; however, few are more picturesque or historic than the Readyville Mill’s eatery, Goodness Gracious at the Mill. Located on the Stones River in—of course—Readyville—the Readyville Mill was built in 1812 by Charles Ready, and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. Today, the mill thrives as a working grist mill—grinding corn and wheat every week, a restaurant and an event venue. Local Table talked with Nicole Ford who, along with her husband, Eric, owns Goodness Gracious*, about the importance of serving local food. More

Meet My Farmer →

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Margot McCormack, Owner/Chef, Margot Cafe & Bar and Marche, Nashville
A Nashville native, Margot returned in 1995 to Nashville from New York City to find her voice in the local restaurant community. Upon her return, local restaurateur Jody Faison introduced her to the work and mission of chef Alice Waters. Now one of the leaders of Nashville’s local food scene, Margot’s philosophy on food and cooking is inspired by French culture, based on seasonality and the very best locally sourced ingredients. We asked her about her favorite farmers. More

Meet My Baker →

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Sweet 16th – The Bakery
Sweet 16th offers baked goods and desserts to suit every taste, from cheddar cheese scones to the "Is it a brownie or is it a cookie?" (Answer: Brookie.) Located at 16th Street and Ordway Place, the bakery's layout makes for a welcoming intimate corner, with gener- ous windows streaming sun- light in on the glass cases filled with freshly baked treats like Heavenly Scones, Hello Dollies layered bars, macaroons, coffee cakes, muffins, and more. Owners Dan and Ellen Einstein offer hugs and handshakes to regulars and friends, smiles to newcomers, and tasty treats to any- one who ventures into their bakery. It's evi- dent the couple dish out more than just pas- tries and sweets. "We love having people in here," says Dan. "It's in our blood to entertain." More

Tennessee Spirits →

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The future of Tennessee whiskey: better and better, more and more.
There’s nothing quite like Tennessee whiskey. Not only is the flavor in general unbeatable (okay, so I’m biased), but it’s also an important part of our economy. In fact, whiskey is one of Tennessee’s top 10 exports. The revenues from export alone exceed $1 billion a year and the total revenue exceeds $2.4 billion (which means that Tennesseans drink a fair amount of what’s being produced, as it should be). Of course, there are the big guys, Jack Daniel’s and George Dickel, and we love them, but some new players are starting to creep into (or at least back into) the market. The newer folks aren’t really trying to compete with Jack Daniel’s, in truth. Instead, they’re focused on the artistry and history of Tennessee distilling. More

CSAs →

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Better Living Through CSA...Here's the skinny
After eating a winter CSA (community supported agriculture) salad, which took all of 15 minutes to prepare, I feel sharper and lighter. And it’s not just my imagination. The ingredients—lettuce, kale, carrots, radishes, sweet peppers, scallions and broccoli—are all part of my bimonthly share of winter CSA. Each vegetable, buzzing with color, was planted and fussed over by godly folk. And they were harvested less than 50 miles away, not yet 24 hours beforehand. There is no way that I can overstate the means by which a CSA adds value to life. In my experience, it is the Holy Grail—the thing by which I muster special powers. Wash, chop, stir and invigorate. More

Food Labels →

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What Does It Mean: Food Labels
Tennessee has a rich culinary history with far-reaching influence and ating healthy can be a complicated endeavor—too many labels, but still not enough information to help you make an educated choice. Local Table has compiled a list of some of the most commonly used national and local food labels and what they mean. If you’ve got further questions on a particular label, we’ve listed a website where you can find out more. The most commonly seen labels at your local farmers’ market include: Certified Organic, Certified Naturally Grown, Certified Humane and PickTN Products. The labeling of eggs has become extremely complex and somewhat controversial. Still confused? Buy from your local farmer! *Animal Welfare Approved (dairy, eggs, chicken, goose, duck, turkey, beef, bison, lamb, goat, pork and rabbit) This is the only USDA-approved third-party certification label that supports and promotes family farmers who raise their animals with the highest welfare standards, outdoors, on pasture or range. More

Farmers' Market 411 →

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Top 10 Tips for Shopping at the Nashville Farmers’ Market
The Nashville Farmers’ Market, located in the center of the downtown urban core, has been feeding Nashville and the surrounding area since 1801. The market is home to more than 150 vendors throughout the year, and is open seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Here are the top 10 tips for shopping at the Nashville Farmers’ Market, no matter what the season may be. More

Diners Worth The Drive →

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Here are a few local favorites that you might not have heard of.
It’s always easy to go somewhere familiar with mass-produced menu items—these eateries are plastered across our televisions and computer screens. But if you take a chance and stroll along some of the more historic parts of town sometimes you can stumble upon some of the best food that you never knew was there—in local diners, cafes and mom-and-pop shops. Such places are the true heroes of the “dine-out” world and what makes the food so special is that it was made by local people who care enough about their communities to share good food that means something to them. Here are a few local favorites that you might not have heard of. More

Healthy Table ❯

Slow Revolution
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Always on the go? Join the Slow Cooker Movement!
Growing up, my family was always on the go. Whether it was school, sports or volunteer activities it was difficult to prepare dinner. We valued sitting down as a family around the dinner table and this was possible with the use of the slow cooker. Believe it or not, the terms slow cooker and short on time actually go together! A great attribute about using a slow cooker is the flexibility it offers. You can toss the ingredients into the slow cooker that morning, cook it all afternoon, and serve it the same evening. More

Ask Farmer Jason ❯

Questions & Answers for kids (and others!)
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Farmer Jason is the brainchild of rock music legend, Jason Ringenberg of Jason and the Scorchers. In 2002, he created Farmer Jason to educate and entertain children about farm life and the wonders of nature.

If you would like to ask him questions, email him at jr@farmerjason.com
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Recipes ❯

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Article Archives ❯

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Seasonality Chart ❯

When Is It In Season Locally?
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